Oldschool Sunday: F.U.C.T.


Forever Ungratical Corinaric Technikilation, otherwise known as F.U.C.T., was formed in Nashville, TN. circa 1986. Starting as the brainchild of two guitarists, Dirt Ditchfield and Brooks Phillips, the duo later added drummer Heath Willis to the band.  

A vocalist was soon found in Clay Brocker, as Dirt switched to playing bass in the band and their earliest line up was complete. The quartet soon played their first show, after which Willis quit the band and was soon replaced with Salvo W. Rodanthe.

By 1987, F.U.C.T. had begun recording demos with that year’s Into The Aggro and the following year’s Within. The music that this band created was some of the most unique, progressively extreme metal happening at the time. It was technical, yet almost discordant at times, with a largely psychedelic style to much of it. Perhaps thrash or crossover, with intense, aggressive vocals describes it best.

The band soon signed to an independent Nashville-based label, Carlyle Records, where they recorded and released Green in 1989. Below is a cut from that effort, ‘Mine‘.

Come 1990, F.U.C.T. would release their landmark album, Dimensional Depth Perception, which resides at a cult status today. At the time of its release, the album was light years ahead of most anything else going on in underground music.

In my opinion, F.U.C.T.‘s only possible contemporaries back then, when it comes to forward-thinking, progressive metal, was probably Voivod. Of course, F.U.C.T. were the much, much heavier of the two.

F.U.C.T. would break up in 1991, after never being able to really break out of their regionally recognized status. They had a huge following in their home region of course, as well as a growing fan base in tape-trading networks of the time.

Each member would go on to play in other projects elsewhere, but nothing with one another. In 2001, guitarist Brooks Phillips died from a purported heroin overdose, which seemingly put to end any hopes of the band’s revival.

However, five years later in 2006, Clay and Dirt (hey, it’s their names) crossed paths at a Nashville Melvins show. Soon they, along with drummer Jerry Gramble, were actively reforming F.U.C.T. for another era of music.

Guitarist Jason Creasey came on board in 2007, and just like before, Clay switched to playing bass once again. This new incarnation of the band began playing shows in their home vicinity, which received huge turnouts of people clamoring to see this cult band again.

In 2008, F.U.C.T. recorded and released a new full-length, Retain To The Aggro, for Abyss Records. The band continued playing shows as well, even being rejoined by earlier drummer Salvo W. Rodanthe at one point.

Last words concerning F.U.C.T. were they were active and planning a new album, tentatively titled Aggroverse.

2 thoughts on “Oldschool Sunday: F.U.C.T.

  1. There original drummers name was Patrick. Last name, bad-ass. He is the only drummer before Jerry Gramble. He was a large contributor to their overall quality, impact, and should not go unsung.

    1. All statements in my piece are derived from extensive research of online sources available (and I NEVER use Wikipedia for the record). The info on the band’s origins and drummers was derived from a “Bio” segment of FUCT’s page on Reverbnation, a source I’ve not had problems with anytime prior. As for Brooks (supposed) OD-related death, that too was derived from an online source I am trying to relocate and provide here. That said, I’m not saying that anything you’ve stated is true or false but you haven’t shared where your claims originate from either be it firsthand/first person knowledge, other sources, etc. or what if you’d care to share them then I’d be happy to attempt to verify them.

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